Monthly Archives: August 2016


TikiKiti Video Rating Scale — What do the numbers mean

The Altered Hours – Who’s Saving Who (Music Video) a video by Aaron Moran

TikiKiti rates videos in eight style categories. These are:

Narrative — a video that has a story element usually based on the lyrics of the song.
Performance — lots of singing and dancing and usually lip syncing.
Abstract — visuals that seem to have a stream of conscious editing.
Vérité — these are usually videos of people doing stuff such as vacation videos without much story or performance elements.
Mashups — a collection of images, mostly taken from YouTube, and editing in a fashion based on the song.
Anime — the anime music video (AMV) is a popular style that is basically a mashup but using other anime.
Machinima — imaging Grand Theft Auto (GTA) characters doing stuff edited to a pop song. There are other type that include some 3D anime styles.
Indie Bands — the newest category that is what it says — indie bands producing their own videos or fans doing it for them.

Each video rating is divided into three criteria with a rating from 0-10 with increments of 0.5 points:

Production Value
Performance and Creativity
Editing

Each criteria is assigned several criteria when determining the final rating. These attributes are:

Production Value:

camera movement
cinematography
costumes/makeup
lighting
production design
special effects
use of locations
use of sets
use of steady-cam

Performance & Creativity:

athletic dance moves
creative dance moves
dance interpretation of lyrics
dance interpretation of music
dancing
dramatic interpretation of lyrics
dramatic interpretation of music
dramatic interpretation of the song’s tone
interaction between characters

Editing:

editing
editing in contrast with music
editing in juxtaposition with the music
editing to rhythm of music
editing to tone of music
lip sync
special editing effects
special effects
special effects in juxtaposition with the music

Each video is given a final score that is an average of all the ratings from our judges. For example, the vérité video above by Aaron Moran received a total average score of 23.5 out of 30 from two judges. If this number seems low, consider that a perfect score of 30.0 would be for a multi million-dollar budget video shot by a star director and edited by some ACE or UKPEG pro editor.

So many independently produced fan videos are expertly produced. At TikiKiti we want to recognize these producers for the excellent work they are doing.